Hip

Anatomy

  • Hip Anatomy

    The hip joint is the largest weight-bearing joint in the human body. It is also referred to as a ball and socket joint and is surrounded by muscles, ligaments, and tendons. The thigh bone or femur and the pelvis join to form the hip joint.

    Any injury or disease of the hip will adversely affect the joint's range of motion and ability to bear weight.

  • Physical Examination of Hip

    The hip joint is the largest weight-bearing joint in the human body. It is also referred to as a ball and socket joint and is surrounded by muscles, ligaments, and tendons. The thigh bone or femur and the pelvis join to form the hip joint.

    Any injury or disease of the hip will adversely affect the joint's range of motion and ability to bear weight.

Conditions

  • Avascular Necrosis

    Avascular NecrosisAvascular necrosis, also called osteonecrosis is a condition in which bone death occurs because of inadequate blood supply to it. Lack of blood flow may occur when there is a fracture in the bone or a joint dislocation that may damage nearbyblood vessels.

  • Osteoarthritis of the Hip

    Osteoarthritis of the HipOsteoarthritis, also called degenerative joint disease is the most common form of arthritis. It occurs most often in older people. This disease affects the tissue covering the ends of bones in a joint (cartilage). In a person withosteoarthritis, the cartilage becomes damaged and worn out causing pain, swelling, stiffness and restricted movement in the affected joint.

  • Inflammatory Arthritis of the Hip

    Inflammatory Arthritis of the HipInflammation of the joints is referred to as arthritis. The inflammation arises when the smooth covering (cartilage) at the end surfaces of the bones wears away. In some cases, the inflammation is caused when the lining of the joint becomesinflamed as part of an underlying systemic disease.

  • Snapping Hip

    Snapping HipThe hip is an important joint that helps us walk, run and jump. The ball-and-socket joint in the hip is formed between the round end of the femur (thighbone) and the cup-shaped socket of the acetabulum (part of the hip bone).

  • Femoroacetabular Impingement

    Femoroacetabular ImpingementFemoroacetabular impingement (FAI) is a condition where there is too much friction in the hip joint from bony irregularities causing pain and decreased range of hip motion. The femoral head and acetabulum rub against each other creating damageand pain to the hip joint.

  • Hip Labral Tear

    Hip Labral TearA hip labral tear is an injury to the labrum, the cartilage that surrounds the outside rim of your hip joint socket. The hip joint is a ball and socket joint in which the head of the femur is the ball and the pelvic acetabulum forms the socket.

  • Hip Instability

    Hip InstabilityThe hip plays an important role in supporting the upper body weight while standing, walking and running, and hip stability is crucial for these functions. The femur (thigh bone) and acetabulum (hip bone) join to form the hip joint, while thelabrum (tissue rim that seals the hip joint) and the ligaments lining the hip capsule maintain the stability of the hip.

  • Hip Fracture

    Hip FractureThe hip joint is a "ball and socket" joint. The "ball" is the head of the femur, or thigh bone, and the "socket" is the cup shaped acetabulum. The joint surface is covered by a smooth articular surface that allows pain free movement in the joint.

  • Hip Pain

    Hip PainHip pain, one of the common symptoms patients complain of, may not always be felt precisely over the hip joint. Pain may be felt in and around the hip joint and the cause for pain is multifactorial. The exact position of your hip pain suggeststhe probable cause or underlying condition causing pain.

  • Transient Osteoporosis of the Hip

    Transient Osteoporosis of the HipTransient osteoporosis of the hip is a rare condition that causes bone loss temporarily in the upper part of the thighbone (femur). It is mostly found in young or middle-aged men between the ages of 30 and 60, and women in their later stages of pregnancy or early postpartum period (following childbirth).

  • Hip Bursitis

    Hip BursitisHip bursitis is a painful condition caused by inflammation of a bursa in the hip. Bursae are fluid filled sacs present in joints between bone and soft tissue to reduce friction and provide cushioning during movement.

  • Gluteus Medius Tear

    Gluteus Medius TearA gluteus medius tear is a condition characterized by severe strain on the gluteus medius muscle that results in partial or complete rupture of the muscle.

  • Chondral Lesions or Injuries

    Chondral Lesions or InjuriesThe hip joint is one of the largest weight-bearing joints in the body, formed by the thigh bone or femur and the acetabulum of the pelvis. It is a ball and socket joint with the head of the femur as the ball and the pelvic acetabulum forming the socket.

  • Developmental Dysplasia

    Developmental DysplasiaDevelopmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) or Hip dysplasia is a condition which is seen in infants and young children because of developmental problems in the hip joint. The femur (thigh bone) partially or completely slips out of the hip socket causing dislocation at the hip joint. It is most common in first born baby with family history of the disorder.

  • Legg-Calve-Perthes-Disease

    Legg-Calve-Perthes-DiseaseLegg-Calve-Perthes Disease (LCPD) or Perthes disease is a disorder of the hip that affects children, usually between the ages of 4 and 10. It usually involves one hip, although it can occur on both sides in some children. It occurs more commonly in boys than girls.

  • Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis

    Slipped Capital Femoral EpiphysisSlipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE) is an unusual disorder of the hip where the ball at the upper end of the thigh bone (femur) slips in a backward direction. This is caused due to weakness of the growth plate.

Procedures

Non-Surgical Treatments

  • Hip Injections

    Hip InjectionsHip joint injections involve injecting medicine directly into the hip joint to diagnose the source of pain or treat pain due to conditions such as arthritis, injury or mechanical stress of the hip joint. Hip pain may be experienced in the hip, buttock, leg or low back.

  • Physiotherapy

    Hip InjectionsPhysiotherapy or physical therapy is an exercise program that helps you to improve movement, relieve pain, encourage blood flow for faster healing, and restore your physical function and fitness level. The main aim of physical therapy is to make your daily activities, such as walking, getting in and out of bed, or climbing stairs, easier.

Surgical Treatments

  • Hip Arthroscopy

    Hip ArthroscopyArthroscopy, also referred to as keyhole or minimally invasive surgery, is a procedure in which an arthroscope is inserted into a joint to check for any damage and repair it simultaneously.

  • Total Hip Replacement

    Total Hip ReplacementTotal hip replacement is a surgical procedure in which the damaged cartilage and bone is removed from the hip joint and replaced with artificial components. The hip joint is one of the body's largest weight-bearing joints, located between the thigh bone (femur) and the pelvis (acetabulum)

  • Anterior Hip Replacement

    Total Hip ReplacementTotal joint replacement surgery is one of the most advanced successful procedures in patients dealing with severe hip and knee pain. The goal of the surgery is to relieve pain and restore the normal functioning of the joint and help patient resume normal activities.

  • Revision Hip Replacement

    Revision Hip ReplacementRevision hip replacement is a complex surgical procedure in which all or part of a previously implanted hip-joint is replaced with a new artificial hip-joint. Total hip replacement surgery is an option to relieve severe arthritis pain thatlimits your daily activities.

  • Robotic-assisted Hip Surgery

    Robotic-assisted Hip SurgeryRobotic hip surgery is an advancement to a traditional hip surgery by using a robotic system to perform the surgery. The robotic system functions as an extension of the surgeon's hands and eyes.

  • Minimally Invasive Total Hip Replacement

    Minimally Invasive Total Hip ReplacementThe hip joint is one of the body's largest weight-bearing joints and is the point where the thigh bone (femur) and the pelvis (acetabulum) join. It is a ball and socket joint in which the head of the femur is the ball and the pelvic acetabulumforms the socket.

  • Pre-op and Post-Op Hip Guidelines

    Pre-op and Post-Op Hip GuidelinesPlanning for your hip surgery prepares you for the operation and helps to ensure a smooth surgery and easier recovery. Here are certain pre-operative and post-operative guidelines which will help you prepare for hip surgery.

  • Caregivers Guide for the Hip

    Caregivers Guide for the HipWhen your friend or loved one has undergone a hip replacement surgery, as a caregiver, you will play an important role in his/her recovery. There are various aspects you need to be aware of to ensure the safety, comfort and recovery of thepatient.

  • Hip Fracture Prevention

    Hip Fracture PreventionHip fractures refer to any kind of breakage or damage in the thigh bone (femur). People over the age of 65, especially women, are highly vulnerable to hip fractures. You will require assistance after hip fractures from family members as well ashealth professionals and may also be required to be admitted to the hospital for further assistance.

  • Birmingham Hip Resurfacing

    Birmingham Hip ResurfacingThe Birmingham Hip Resurfacing (BHR) is a metal-on-metal prosthesis used in hip resurfacing procedure. Hip Resurfacing is a bone conserving procedure where the acetabulum (hip socket) is replaced and femoral head is resurfaced. Hip resurfacingis indicated in all the individuals with arthritis where conservative treatment was a failure.

  • Complex Hip Reconstruction Surgery

    Complex Hip Reconstruction SurgeryComing soon

  • Hip Preservation Surgery

    Hip Preservation SurgeryThe hip is a ball and socket joint comprising of the femur (thigh bone) and the pelvic bone. The head of the femur (ball) articulates with a cavity (socket) called the acetabulum in the pelvic bone. To facilitate smooth and frictionless movementof the hip joint, the articulating surfaces of the femur head and acetabulum are covered by spongy articular cartilage.